1972 Articles

Title

1972 Articles

Description

The 1972 Madison’s Heritage collection features a series on a 1937 survey of the county. Articles about floods and blizzards show the impact that weather has had on the county’s history. “Campus Murder Case” highlights one of the great unsolved mysteries in Berea’s history. Two articles draw from information gathered from an old newspaper, the Richmond Whig Chronicle from 1851. This series continues on into 1972. “A Moonlight School” gives some interesting knowledge about the county’s educational history. “An Uncommon Couple” and “Henry Allen Laine” show the importance of African American presence in the county’s history. “Where are they Now?” and “What Used to be There?” begin the first of many attempts by Dr. Engle to document the historical layout of downtown Richmond, complete with the businesses, churches, and government buildings that have shaped the town center.

Contributor

Kathryn Engle

Items in the 1972 Articles Collection

Old Advertising Examples from Whig Chronicle, 1851
Advertisements were numerous and of great interest in the 19th Century editions of the Richmond Whig Chronicle. Under Religious Notices, it was announced that Elder Thomas Smith would preach at Mt. Olivet meeting house 1st Saturday and Sunday in…

Richmond Commercial Club
An imbalance of trade caused by Madison Countians doing their Christmas shopping in larger cities to the north was only one of the concerns that motivated a large group of local businessmen to establish the Richmond Commercial Club in December, 1905.…

Gleanings From Chronicle- 1851
One of the newspapers published in Richmond in the 19th century was the Richmond Whig Chronicle. A reading of it gives us insight into the way our ancestors lived here in Madison County.

A copy of this paper was shown to the editor of the Richmond…

Christmas Here in 1880
The weekly newspapers in Richmond during the Christmas season in 1880 had none of the large display ads for gifts and decorations that we find this season.

Judging from the space that the newspapers devoted to the various subjects, there was more…

What Used to be There?
In my last article, "Where Are They Now?," I wrote about some of the businesses of Richmond which are no longer to be found. For those of you who did not live in Richmond in the 1933-1950 era and for historians of the future, here is the correct…

A Moonlight School
Back around the turn of the Century, there were informally conducted classes for near-illiterate adults, usually conducted by charity organizations. The sessions were held in a local schoolhouse at night after the regular school day was over and the…

Where Are They Now?
If you were to listen in on a couple of 40-year old Madison Countians discussing "The Good Old Days" and you did not live in Richmond in the 1930's and 1940's you might be at a loss to know what they were talking about.

"See you at Joe's. I'll…

The Holiday Turkey Business
In the early 1900's, Madison County developed into one of the largest turkey raising and processing centers in this area of the country. On several hundred farms and in the backyards of many Richmond residences turkeys were hatched in large numbers…

Property Assessment in 1911
About the first of March in 1911, the Madison County Board of Equalization completed a three-month-long reassessment of the property in the county. When finally completed under the direction of June Baxter and W.S. Hunley, the county assessor's books…

An Early Women's Rights Group
The women's lib movement of these times brings to mind a much older pioneer effort along these lines. The women's suffrage movement of the 19th century sought to have the women's political, civil and property rights equal to those that the men had…

The Greatest Show Plays Here
In the early morning hours of an October day slightly over half a century ago, people from this section of Kentucky began converging on the city of Richmond. They came by horseback, in automobiles, in buggies, and on foot; they came by the wagonload…

Part IV: 1937 Survey
September 6, 1937: "Madison County Housing Better than Average of State, Survey Shows."

"Rural housing in Madison County is directly proportionate to the productivity of the soil--best housing is found in the northern or Bluegrass section of the…

1937 Survey: Part III
September 4, 1937--“Exceptional Educational Opportunities Available in Madison County.”

"Madison County; from its one-room schools to its two nationally known colleges, provides educational opportunities for its own and others.

“Of the…

1937 Survey: Part II
September 3, 1937—“Richmond Well Suited for Moderate Size Industrial Concern"

With a population of nearly 7,000 inhabitants, Richmond -the only urban community in Madison County - presents an ensemble of the county's richness within its city…

Former Survey is Recalled
In the year 1937 a survey was made of the problems in Madison County, and a series of articles appeared in the Daily Register on this subject. A reprint of them gives an insight into the conditions in Madison County during the great…

A 40-Year-Old Phone Directory
A little over 40 years ago the Southern Bell Telephone Co. took over local telephone operations from the Cumberland Telephone & Telegraph Co., another licensee of the Bell system.

In October, 1931, a new Richmond directory was issued, listing…

Campus Murder Case
All my life the writer has heard reference to the shooting of the Berea College coed on that school’s campus. However, I knew no details before reading the Aug. 16, 1937, issue of the Richmond Daily Register. It said:

Berea, Kentucky, August…

Palestine P. Ballard
A man important in Madison County affairs for most of the 19th Century was Palestine P. Ballard, a leader in politics, military affairs and business. Ballard was born in 1818 or 1820—depending on whether you read his tombstone or the information…

Deeds were Uncovered by WPA
Most of us think of the WPA in connection with building. However, in Dec. of 1938 the WPA was engaged in indexing at the Madison County Court clerk's office. Among the things uncovered by this indexing were many old deeds.

The shortest deed was…

Old Drugstores
Drugstores were apparently a part of the Richmond business scene from the early years following the incorporation of the city in 1809.

Perhaps the oldest known drugstore location in Richmond is the building on the corner of Main and Second St.,…

A Madison County Blizzard
On January 8,1886, a blizzard, the kind that is usually found in the Northeastern U.S. suddenly hit Madison County. The winter had been rather cold up to that day, with an average temperature of 44 degrees in November, and 36 degrees in December. The…

McCreary Anniversary Banquet
On the night of July 28, 1938 a banquet was held in the dining room of the Glyndon Hotel in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of James B. McCreary, twice governor and once senator of the Commonwealth and a native of Madison County.…

A Kentucky River Flood
Before flood control on the Kentucky River was as highly developed as now, there were disabling floods every couple of years. Many an older resident can tell tales that start, "I remember when the water got over the road at..."

One such flood came…

A Tradition that is Missed
Halloween used to be a big celebration in Richmond. The main streets were blocked off and everyone dressed up and walked down the center of Main Street looking at everyone else. A platform was set up in the court house square (corner of Main and…

Where to Find a Doctor in Richmond in the 1880s
Before the Pattie A. Clay Infirmary was established in 1892, there was no hospital in Richmond. Most people who were seriously ill or injured were cared for at their own homes until they either got well or died in their own beds. From time to time…

The Last Execution
On September 2, l938, Parkie Denny, 44, became the fourth person sentenced to death by the Madison County Circuit Court, to be executed. Denny was electrocuted at the state penitentiary at Eddyville for the murder of his wife. He steadfastly insisted…

Remembering Four Cottages
Not too many people remember the four cottages that used to be on the Eastern campus, but most who have spent any time on the University grounds remember two of them. The cottages stood in a row on the portion of Campus Drive (later University Drive)…

An Early Church Convention
The Otter Creek meetinghouse in Madison County was the scene of an early 19th Century Baptist Association meeting. Delegates from 17 Baptist churches in Madison and several of the surrounding counties were approved and seated for a two-day meeting…

Governor James B. McCreary
One of the more interesting tombstones in Richmond Cemetery is the one over the grave of Governor James B. McCreary.

McCreary, a native of Richmond, was and is one of the few two term governors in the Commonwealth, having served from 1875-1879 and…

Business at End of Civil War
In the months following the end of the Civil War in 1865, business in Richmond was more or less back to normal. With the exception of reports of nearby raids by John Hunt Morgan's men, there had been no military excitement here since the aftermath of…

Campus Military Training
Military training on the campuses of Madison County colleges goes back to the days of Central University when the chancellor and many of the faculty were ex-Confederate officers and emphasized the military side of education. Drill and cannon firing…

Unusual Ordinances of '94
From the little book of Richmond city bylaws and ordinances published in 1893, we get an understanding of the concerns of the city's political leaders some 80 years ago. Ordinances enacted or codified by the city council were to go into effect on…

Henry Allen Laine
Not many Madison Countians are well known authors, nor for that matter have many ever published a line. But Henry Allen Laine (1870-1955) is a widely known and well read poet.

The late Professor Laine was born in the Old Cane Springs community of…

City Officials, Duties in '93
A modest little black-covered volume tucked away among the hundreds of treasure items in Eastern's Townsend Room gives us a delightful glimpse of Richmond's city government in the 1890's. Published in 1893, by the Climax Printing Co., this complete…

The National Guard, Locally
A few years ago the 441st Field Artillery Battalion became the 103rd Supply and Service Battalion. I wonder how many Madison Countians know of the long and glorious service that men from the local National Guard have given for their country.

Most,…

Richmond in 1811
In the spring of 1881, a 78 year old man Zachariah Hunley of Athens, Fayette County, arrived in Richmond to “see the town.” He got to talking to the editor of the Kentucky Register, and remarked that although he had lived for over 70 years within…

The 4-H Organization
The 4-H Club is the largest organization in the world for rural boys and girls. The training of these youth comes from the Extension office and this organization has been very active in Madison County for 40-50 years.

The first organization of…

Chasing a Counterfeiter
On a cold Saturday morning in December, 1879, Deputy U.S. Marshall Pendelton Morris of Louisville with three other agents especially appointed for their task rode their horses through Richmond on their way to catch a Madison County…

Some Interesting Lot Transfers
Some interesting lot transfers have taken place on the edge of the Eastern campus.

Central University took title to the campus land in 1874. In 1892 CU sold a lot to William A. Anderson, brother of Mrs. Anne W. Walters, widow of Singleton P.…

Expert at Escape, Preaching
James Wesley Huguley was a Madison County man who developed something of a reputation as an escapee from military prison during the Civil War, and in later life as a church leader.

Huguely was a young man of 22 when he joined the Confederate Army…

Walters Institute Trustees
The Articles of Incorporation for the Walters Collegiate Institute of Richmond required that a majority of the trustees should be citizens of Madison County and two thirds of them be Presbyterians. Walters' predecessor, Central University, was a…

Celebrating the Armistice
When the final armistice was negotiated for the end of World War I, there was no television to flash the news across the nation. There were only a few radios, and they were just crystal receivers of experimenters. The word of the end of the greatest…

Red House, Waco Teams
Red House in the State? Waco only three wins away from the State Championship? Fairy tales? No, facts.

In 1929 Red House High School, with around 30 students including the girls, was undefeated in county basketball play. Then in the District they…

Destruction of Caldwell School
(The mention of Caldwell High School in two of our previous articles has prompted a number of persons to ask that we give more details about its untimely end. Many of our older residents will recognize the following account.)

Caldwell School was a…

Walters Collegiate Institute
During the five years (1901-1906) between the exodus of Central University and the arrival of Eastern Kentucky State Normal School, there existed on the old C.U. grounds the Walters Collegiate Institute. The school was basically a college preparatory…

The Village of Silver Creek
About four or five houses, an old train tunnel and a deserted railroad station are about all that is left of the once busy town of Silver Creek which flourished during the 19th Century.

Established in the early 1800's, this village was located…

The Corner Drugstore
The corner drugs store is an American institution and Richmond has had its share. Cornett's, Stockton's, Begley's, and Hinkle's have in their turn attracted the soda and sundae crowd. One of the oldest drugstore corners is the one now occupied by…

William H. Miller, Genealogist
Those persons in this region of Kentucky who trace family histories for fun and profit know well the value of the works of William H. Miller, but few others seem to know of him.

Born on Muddy Creek in Madison County on October 22, 1852, William…

Madison Tobacco Warehouse Co.
Around the turn of the century there were only three buyers of tobacco — American Tobacco Company, Imperial Tobacco Company (British) and Regie Tobacco Company (French). These drove the price of tobacco below cost. The tobacco growers banded…

Short-Lived Bus Line
A business which was surely one of the shortest-lived ever in Richmond was the Powers' Automobile Line. On March 28, 1906, Joseph Powers of Lexington arrived in Richmond to start a bus line between Richmond and Lexington. He set up shop, and that…

EKU Publications, Personalities
I have just read a privately published booklet by Professor Richard A. Edwards on the beginnings of two student publications at Eastern —The Eastern Progress and The Milestone. Both were begun in 1922 and facsimiles of old Progresses are given in…

An Uncommon Couple
"It is a noble thing to do a common thing in an uncommon way." That statement by Booker T. Washington is carved as an epitaph on the headstone at the graves of Henry and Mona Deatherage, located in the old Lipscomb family burial ground about two…