1973 Articles

Title

1973 Articles

Description

Many articles in the 1973 describe disasters in the county, including kidnappings, train wrecks, fires, severe storms, and long winters. Many articles also recount the rich military history of the county including Madison Countians’ involvement in the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, and World War I. “Madison’s Mallory Springs” and “The Other Boonesborough” detail recreational opportunities of the county’s past. “The Green-Faced Man” details one of the county’s exciting legends. “Recalling Doylesville Days” and “Excitement at Moberly” profile two of Madison County many villages. Many articles discuss the county’s educational heritage including the founding of Central University, Eastern Kentucky State Normal School, and Model. “The Miller Papers” discusses genealogies and important Madison County families (see also “William H. Miller, Genealogist,” 2/2/1972). The story of the 400 pound pioneer adds to the rich history of early settlers in the area.

Contributor

Kathryn Engle

Items in the 1973 Articles Collection

An Early BC Commencement
"Those who have never been present at a commencement of Berea College,” wrote French Tipton, editor of the Climax, "have no concept of its magnitude." Tipton had just returned from the college's 21st commencement in June, 1887, and he shared the…

The Miller Papers
Back in 1906-07, William Harris Miller of Richmond published "History & Genealogies" of certain families, who had settled in the Madison County area.

Detailed descriptions were given of the families of Miller, Woods, Harris, Wallace, Maupin,…

Virginia House'
‘One of the earliest houses in the wilderness of Kentucky was built sometime prior to 1788. Since the house was erected at the time that all of Kentucky was just a county of Virginia, its pioneer builder, David Moore, named it "Virginia House."…

World War II Days
Remember Pearl Harbor! Remember the song by that title? And others like "Heil, Phtut, Right In Der Feuhrer's Face,” "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree," "Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition," and "Coming in on a Wing and a Prayer?" Then you…

Genuine D. Boone Autograph?
A number of relics and evidences of Daniel Boone’s presence exist in Madison County, for it was here that he had his first home base in the wilderness of Kentucky. In the Dorris Museum at Eastern and at other places we have some articles of…

County Schools, Superintendents
Russell Roberts is the 14th known superintendent of the Madison County school system.

He is a native of Paris, Ky., and taught in Powell County before coming to Madison. He was the first head basketball coach at the merged Madison Central in 1955…

Wedding But No Honeymoon
In the Spring of 1888 the thoughts of a smooth-talking young man named Wood turned o love, and he proposed marriage to Miss Bettie Doyle if Richmond, who accepted.

The wedding date was set and the wedding feast was prepared. The minister, family…

The Old Turner Place
The Old Turner Place is a ruined farm house on the Russell Broaddus farm on Tates Creek Pike. I am indebted to Mr. Broaddus and to George T. Turner for information on the house.

This Turner family came to Kentucky from North Carolina and trace…

Business District Fire
Amid floods, epidemics and shoot-outs, it seems that once or twice every generation a large part of Richmond's business district would burn down. The block on the south side of West Main between Second and Third was largely destroyed by fire in the…

The Model School
The Model School, later known as The Training School, and still later as Model Laboratory School, opened September 11, 1906, four months before classes began at the Normal School. It was, in a sense, a continuation of the Walters Collegiate…

Storing Ice was Annual Chore
The next time you complain about having to crack the ice cubes out of the refrigerator tray, remember how difficult it was for farm folks in Madison County to have ice for their drinks at the beginning of this century.

First the farmer had to have…

The Green-Faced Man
In my recent column on Mallory Springs, I promised to tell the "Legend of the Green-Faced Man." Here it is, as written by me and published in the Richmond Daily Register on August 25, 1945:

"For many years, the legend of the green-faced man has…

Confederate Vets in 1909
In the fall of 1909, some 44 years after the end of that war between neighbors, County native David Chenault sought to identify all the Confederate army veterans residing in Madison County. Chenault, who served under Gen. John Hunt Morgan, identified…

Madison's Mallory Springs
Many people know of Hot Springs and White Sulphur Springs. People still go to Red Boiling Springs and Clear Creek Mountain Springs. But how about Madison County's own Mallory Springs?

Located in the Red Lick section of Madison, not far from Big…

Hung as a Spy
A young man of the Waco community went off to fight with the Confederate Army, but became a victim in one of those innumerable injustices of war. E.S. Dodd became a private in Co. D of Terry's Texas Rangers fighting in East Tennessee under…

The Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry
Much has been written about the Battle of Richmond, Kentucky. But here is a different version as told by the records of the Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry which spent the early part of the Civil War in Central Kentucky.

General Bragg had moved his…

Prof. Tobin's Sine Pendulum
T.W. Tobin, a civil engineer who taught science at Central University in the late 1870s, was a creative experimenter and inventor. During his tenure at the university in Richmond he designed and constructed a pendulum instrument which, when operated…

Those Who Died
The end of the Vietnam War and the return of the POWs calls to mind the different ways in which Madison County has reacted to different wars. Of course Madison County was exposed to war from the time of the Indians. At the end of World War I a plaque…

Madison's First Railroad
Agitation for a railroad in Madison County started soon after the end of the Civil War. In a vote taken in 1867, a proposition to raise $750,000 through the issuance of bonds and other means passed by small plurality.

Those in favor were lead by…

Remembering Lost John
Although he was from Lexington, Lost John was a part of Madison County's heritage, too. With his black top hat and long tail coats, the old Negro gentleman was a familiar sight in and about Richmond in the 1940s and 1950s. Sometimes he was seen…

Public School Budget- 1908
The annual report of the Richmond City Schools for the 1908-09 school year consisted of 100 pages of very accurate and detailed information. The report had been prepared under the able leadership of Thomas Jackson Coates who served as superintendent…

The District Tournaments
As I was watching Madison High defeat Madison Central one night a few weeks ago I found myself thinking of all the good district finals that have been played in Madison County over the years. A look at the records for a 40-year period since 1927…

The Worst Train Wreck
Run two trains head-on into each other at 40 miles an hour? That’s no way to run a railroad, but that's exactly what happened in Madison County just a little over half a century ago.

It was about 11 o'clock on the night of March 21, 1910, when…

Boonesborough Girls Kidnapped
Everyone knows the story of the kidnapping of the Boone and Callaway girls by the Indians near Boonesborough, but it is interesting to retell the story as it appeared in the Richmond Climax in 1900 and re-run in the Daily Register: a number of years…

Double Disaster in 1909
In the first days of August, 1909, Richmond was dealt a double disaster which left it stunned for a while.

Dark clouds came up ominously about the time people were sitting down to their evening meal on Aug. 5. Before the supper dishes could be…

Hollywood in Richmond
Hollywood in Richmond? Movie Stars on Main Street? Yes, indeed. It really happened, back in 1937.

From the Richmond Daily Register: "All the fanfare, the brilliance and the realness of a veritable Hollywood Premiere will be reproduced in all its…

Excitement at Moberly
Sam Jackson and his two sons were making good use of the fine spring weather on April 26, 1906. They had plowed most of the day on their farm four miles east of Moberly, but about 3 p.m. their work suddenly came to a halt.

Across the plowed field…

Berea Postoffice- 1937
The September 10, 1937 issue of the Richmond Daily Register featured an article concerning the New Berea postoffice, and it read as follows:

"When Berea's new $53,000 postoffice is dedicated Saturday, the building will be more than a symbol of the…

Early Richmond Businesses
Not much is known about the very early businesses in this city. We have some information about stories, stagecoaches, craftsmen and professional leaders from about 1850 on, but for the times earlier than that our knowledge is scant. A quite valuable…

More Information From 1851 Edition of Whig Chronicle
Where Was the Webster House?

Have you wondered just where the Webster House was located in Richmond? Two proprietors, Dudley Webster and Samuel A. Hatch, carry a good size advertisement and say their hostelry is located on Main street in the same…

Richmond Gets Normal School
"Richmond wins, and so does Bowling Green," proclaimed a telegram from Louisville which arrived in this city on the afternoon of May 7, 1906. The state education commissioners' meeting had just decided on the locations of the first two state normal…

Henry Clay & Good Old Days (From Whig Chronicle, 1851)
Henry Clay, population trends, and farm products were often discussed in the 19th Century editions of the Whig Chronicle:

Letters from Henry Clay

As the Whig Party organ, of which Henry Clay was the leading figure in the nation, clippings are…

Normal School Registration
Next week Eastern will enroll over 10,000 students for the spring term. That provides quite a contrast to enrollment back in 1915. Spring quarter registration started on Jan. 26 of that year, and the Normal School officials predicted that there would…