Browse Items (42 total)

This is the second article based on the social page of the Richmond Daily Register in 1936. This time we deal with a selection of weddings.

“Hurst-Vaughn

Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Hurst announce the marriage of their daughter, Anna, to Mr. Ebre S.…

I recently read “Old Kentucky Watering Places” by Lexingtonian J. Winston Coleman Jr. It appeared originally in the Filson Club History Quarterly of January 1942. The spas were for people to partake of the curing qualities of mineral spring…

Many of us spent New Year’s Day watching one football game after another. When I first tuned my radio in to these events back in the 1940s, there were only five bowl games — Rose, Sugar, Orange, Cotton and Sun. Early in World War II, they moved…

This is a second column on sports history. In the first one, we discussed football bowls and basketball. In particular, we traced Madison High’s four trips to the state basketball tournament. Less well known are the trips to the state by Red House…

This is a column about Madison County high schools over the years.

Madison Academy (for boys) began in 1814. There also was Madison Female Institute for girls. There were other private high schools in the county, including one at Kirksville and…

The late Dr. Russell Todd, a local dentist and long-time resident of Madison County, wrote a short history ofthe early days ofthe First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). I present it for your enjoyment.

Church History for Centennial Program…

At Eastern, in the 1930 to 1950 era, there was a loud whistle which was blown to start and end classes. For example, 9 a.m. end, 9:10 start. It was located near the power plant. The campus was much smaller then and the whistle could be heard in every…

I recently read an article in the Richmond Register about Ethel Collins, age 99, of Poosey Ridge. She was a school teacher in Madison County and the article listed the chronology of schools she was associated with. She first attended Hugh School on…

This year, 2009, Americans are celebrating the 200th anniversary of the births of President Abraham Lincoln (U.S.A.) and President Jefferson Davies (C.S.A.). Both were born in Kentucky in 1809. Also born in Kentucky that same year was Christopher…

I mentioned in an earlier column about the response I received after my column about lost schools. I was told about two schools on Jacks Creek Pike (Buffalo and Forest Hill) and one on Flint Road in the College Hill area (Broom Sage). I have since…

This article presents interesting items from the 1963 manuscript, “I Remember Richmond,” written by Arthur K. Akers of Gulfport, Miss. His father was a professor at Richmond’s Central University, the Southern Presbyterian school which preceded…

What was Richmond like in the 1890s? We can glean some knowledge from a further look at Arthur K. Aker’s manuscript mentioned in earlier columns.

Under religion, Aker lists the downtown churches which I also remember — Baptist, Methodist,…

In 1991 Madison and Jessamine and Fayette counties took over the Valley View ferry. At that time Jessamine County Judge Executive Neal Cassity interviewed Ed Land, who was born in Valley View in 1916 and was raised there. The ferry originated in 1785…

In 1991 Madison and Jessamine and Fayette counties took over the Valley View ferry. At that time Jessamine County Judge Executive Neal Cassity interviewed Ed Land, who was born in Valley View in 1916 and was raised there. The ferry originated in 1785…

Linda Ashley provided me with excerpts from the diary of Professor Josephus Newton Davis, in which he mentions several early schools in Madison County. Davis states he taught at Hays Fork of Silver Creek, near B. F. Moore’s place, a house rented…

Jackie Couture, historian and university record officer at Eastern’s Crabbe Library (University Archives) developed and printed a waterways map of the county (1999). It shows the creeks and branches in our county and is a most interesting document.…

How did citizens get around Richmond in the 1890s? Well, it was small enough that you could walk, if you had the time, but there were other modes of transportation as we can learn from Arthur Aker’s 1963 manuscript, which we have mentioned…

Referring again to Arthur Akers’ manuscript we can learn about health care in the late 19th century in Richmond. Akers lists the following local doctors: Dr. Poyntz, Dr. Kennedy and Dr. Holton (a homeopath).

A major medicine for children was…

My long time co-author, Dr. Robert Grise, had written of the coming of utility companies to Richmond. In this column, I approach this subject with some interesting facts from Arthur Aker’s manuscript.

Seemingly the city water works came into…

We have already discussed Madison County libraries in earlier columns. We have extensively covered the long history of the Eastern Kentucky University library in several columns over the years.

The Model Training School — High School library was…

A cousin of mine recently wrote me of his trips to Crosley Field in Cincinnati in the days of his youth. That triggered my own memories of going to see the Reds play.

Back in the last half of the 1940s, my uncle Ewell Stinson took me to my first…

Up until the first quarter of the 19th century, there was no organized Baptist church in Richmond. Those of that faith had to worship at the county Baptist churches. In 1828, Green Clay, father of Cassius Clay of White Hall, made over the title of a…

Did you read the recent article in the Lexington paper about Kenny Davis and the Olympic medals? He lives just across the county line in Garrard, so I believe it is an appropriate subject for a column. His wife, Dr. Rita Davis, taught with me for a…

Where did one go for a drink in the Richmond of the 1890s? To answer this question, let’s go to the 1963 manuscript of Arthur K. Ackers – “I Remember Richmond.”

Bill Jones’ saloon was located on N. Second Street, across from courthouse…

Did you see the recent article in the Richmond Register about mapping the Richmond Cemetery? In it, Bill Robinson explained how burial sites were being located via ground radar. Even sites containing more than one body can be imaged.

The Richmond…

The “Richmond Climax” was a predecessor of the “Richmond Register.” Jasper Castle provided me with a copy of the Climax from Jan. 11, 1899. Of special interest from this issue is a column by Gov. Ed Brown about several Madison County…

This is the second and concluding part of an article quoting from the old Richmond Climax of Jan.11 and March 1, 1899. “Governor” Ed Brown continues to wax poetic (figuratively and literally) about villages and regions in our county in the last…

Floyd Coleman recently sent me information on local men who served in the 7th Cavalry under Gen. George Armstrong Custer. I had mentioned Thomas Stivers in a recent column about the Richmond Cemetery. Coleman’s information clarified some of my…

Randall Shew passed away recently. He was an outstanding publisher of the Richmond Register during the early days of this column. Madison’s Heritage is 40 years old this year. Robert Grise and I began writing it in 1969. It may be the longest…

After a recent column in which I wrote about trips to the state tournament by basketball teams from Red House High and Waco High, I received requests to reprint an earlier column about a 1931 state tournament trip by the White Hall High girls’…

What did the citizens of Richmond eat in the 1890’s? Let us refer back once more to Arthur K. Aker’s 1963 manuscript, “I remember Richmond.” He begins by reminding us that his father was a professor at Central University and did not make much…

This is part two in our look at what the citizens of Richmond ate in the 1890s, based on Arthur K. Aker’s manuscript.

Chickens were brought home live and killed on the premises. Their necks were wrung off and headless fowls flopped wildly —…

Back in my high school days (1943-47), Bob Ackman was both basketball and baseball coach at Madison High. He was very successful at both. In basketball, the Purples went to the state tournament three out of four years. In 1944, the team placed third…

In a recent column on what the citizens of Richmond ate in the 1890s, I mentioned a cake or bread called a Sally Lunn. I asked if anyone had ever heard of it. In Collins English Dictionary the item Sally Lunn is defined as a round cake made from…

When the U.S. government bought land in Madison County and established the Bluegrass Ordnance Depot, several old mansions were torn down. One of these was Castlewood.

Located on Big Hill Road, James Estill built it in 1825. He was a nephew of…

I remember many Thanksgivings in the Richmond of long ago (for me, 1935-1965). Thanksgiving originally was not an annual holiday and was celebrated only if the President of the United States issued a proclamation. President Franklin Roosevelt tried…

This is the second article based on the 1965-1966 Eastern faculty-staff directory discovered by my wife in a pile of old items. The first column dealt with faculty, this one with the staff employees.

Robert R. Martin was president and Ann Hoge…

What kind of after school or weekend work could a boy find in 1890s Richmond? I will again refer to the Akers’ manuscript.

First, there apparently was lots do to around the house. Coal had to be brought in for the stoves and the open fireplaces…

This column is based on information very kindly provided by local historian Jasper Castle. Many people in Madison County do not realize that in 1886, we commercially made our own whiskey right here in the county.

Out on Lancaster Pike, where it…

What was Christmas like here long ago, in the years of 1935-1955?

For a starter, the Christmas trees looked different. Almost all the trees were “live,” home county-cut cedar trees. The stand was a wooden “x” attached to the base of the…

There have been several Boonesborough celebrations. The first was in 1840, 65 years after the fort was settled. It was triggered by an article by Nathaniel Hart, setting forth the contention that Boonesborough, and not Harrodsburg, was the first…
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