Browse Items (122 total)

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1991/1991-004.jpg
One popular Madison County myth claims that the village of Red House was so named when the Kentucky Central railroad was built through there. A large red brick house is said to have been directly in the path of the railroad, and the owner refused to…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1991/1991-007.jpg
On Nov. 11, 1931, the ferry that for 132 years carried traffic across the Kentucky River at Boonesboro ceased operations. In its place a huge steel and concrete bridge opened. (Note that I am using the short version of the word rather than the longer…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1992/1992-035.jpg
The last two Saturday Madison's Heritage columns dealt with the L&N's abandonment in 1932 of the old RNIB Railroad line which ran through Madison County. Reasons given were that the timber in Estill County and the coal around Beattyville were…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1992/1992-034.jpg
In 1932, at the request of the owner, the L&N Railroad, the Interstate Commerce Commission in Washington examined the conditions of the 77-mile rail line that ran through Madison County via Valley View, Richmond and Brassfleld, and allowed it to…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1992/1992-033.jpg
A headline in the October 3, 1992 issue of the Richmond Daily Register announced "Railway Line is Abandoned," something the people of Madison County already knew. The 77-mile rail-road that started at Cliffside in Franklin County and ran through…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1992/1992-013.jpg
I knew about a lot of the ferries on the Kentucky River as it circles Madison County, but did not remember there being one at the end of Poosey Ridge. The road deadends at the river bank. However, I am now told that there used to be a ferry…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1992/1992-006.jpg
On the last three days of the year 1921, crowds of persons continually jammed the Madison County Clerks office all day long, keeping the clerks busy throughout their working hours. What was happening? Back in the 1920's, state law had all the…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1992/1992-005.jpg
At six o'clock on the evening of Thursday, May 22, 1924, a special L&N train pulled into the Richmond depot. From the ten Pullman cars poured out some 150 CEO's and business managers from Louisville. They were on a tour of Kentucky cities and…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1973/1973-017.jpg
Agitation for a railroad in Madison County started soon after the end of the Civil War. In a vote taken in 1867, a proposition to raise $750,000 through the issuance of bonds and other means passed by small plurality.

Those in favor were lead by…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1973/1973-012.jpg
Run two trains head-on into each other at 40 miles an hour? That’s no way to run a railroad, but that's exactly what happened in Madison County just a little over half a century ago.

It was about 11 o'clock on the night of March 21, 1910, when…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1972/1972-003.jpg
A business which was surely one of the shortest-lived ever in Richmond was the Powers' Automobile Line. On March 28, 1906, Joseph Powers of Lexington arrived in Richmond to start a bus line between Richmond and Lexington. He set up shop, and that…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1971/1971-031.jpg
A far-sighted prediction by a leading Madison County businessman some 75 years ago startled a good many local citizens and started no telling how many arguments. Way back in 1897, two or three years before the first automobile was ever seen of the…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1971/1971-029.jpg
Advertisements of the Richmond automobile dealers in the Richmond Daily Register half a century ago revealed the community's considerable interest in automobiles and also something of the competition among the dealers in that rapidly developing…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1971/1971-027.jpg
Although we can’t be absolutely sure, the first horseless carriage that appeared in Richmond in all probability was a sort of motorized buggy driven into town in the year 1900 by a Lexington traveling salesman for Dr. Pierce’s patent medicines.…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1971/1971-019.jpg
About noontime on Wednesday, April 21, 1920, a crowd of men and boys gathered along Main Street and around the courthouse square waiting for an unusual "parade" to arrive in Richmond. The Central Kentucky Truck Dealers Association had organized a…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1971/1971-006.jpg
Before the invention of the electric refrigerator the people of Richmond and Madison County were able to have ice for summer use only through a rather difficult process.

In the coldest part of winter when the ice would form in a thick layer on…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1971/1971-001.jpg
A small, 28- page brochure entitled "Madison County Ky., Its Possessions and Opportunities" was printed in 1928 by business leaders in an attempt to get Madison County its share of the growing U.S. economy of the 1920's. Although there is no way to…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1970/1970-023.jpg
Back in April, 1920 the installation of a new sewer system covering most of the city of Richmond brought about the discovery of some evidence of the early pioneer trail through this part of Kentucky, the Wilderness Road or Boone's Trace. Workmen of…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1969/1969-036.jpg
On a cold and snowy morning in January, 1879, with the temperature hovering near zero, Train No. 16 left the Richmond station (the Eastern end of the Rowland Branch of the L & N) headed for Lancaster and other points west.

Capt. Roberts, the…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1969/1969-033.jpg
In the period after the Civil War, Louisville and Cincinnati vied in a strong rivalry to become the leading center of commercial trade for the South. Cincinnati was larger, but Louisville could claim to be a Southern city, being south of the Ohio…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1969/1969-028.jpg
In the latter half of the 19th Century, Richmond was served by a stage coach line which covered the territory between Lexington and Irvine, a distance of 46 miles by loose rock and dirt roads. It must have been quite a sight three times a day…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1969/1969-018.jpg
Streetcars in Richmond? Yes, that's correct. During the early 1890's when it was a good bit of trouble to hitch up a horse to run an errand or deliver a message and there were few telephones, there actually were streetcars running along Main Street…

http://www.library-old.eku.edu/new/content/archives/engle/1969/1969-014.jpg
About fourteen miles northwest of Richmond on Ky. 169 is a quiet little village at the mouth of Tates Creek where it enters the Kentucky River. As a person drives through the village he goes down to the river where one of the last ferryboats in the…
Output Formats

atom, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-json, omeka-xml, rss2